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Professional Growth


More than pre-Pandemic, I appreciate the value of getting closer to something in order to better understand it.

Like many of you, I’m sure, I am driven, focused, and ambitious. As my best friend likes to say, I don’t meander! Maybe it’s the New Yorker in me, but I want to get from point A to point B as efficiently as possible. It turns out that to keep my sanity, I needed to start taking the long way.

The truth is, I know that I probably would not have applied had the pandemic not happened, and so I am grateful for this silver lining in the cloudy COVID-19 days. This forced change that we all endured inspired to me to listen to my heart and consider what change and impact I wanted to make in the Jewish world.

The power of career changes in the new occupational world, which emphasizes abilities and projects rather than skills and trades, lies in the fact that nothing is ever lost.

One of the toughest decisions that we will all need to make at different points in our careers is to know when to declare victory and move on. When is the right time to go?

When I embarked on my transition, I was looking forward to reaching my next destination. Six years later, I have realized that there is a deep value in holding on to the experience of transition itself. With the discomfort of transition comes a unique brand of wisdom and perspective.

Gratitude, the basic, fundamental awareness of the good we receive, the gift of life that is bestowed upon us wholly undeserved on our part, is something our sages tried hard to cultivate across generations. And I submit gratitude is not a simple concept.

For me, the amount of supervision comes down to a formula I’ve developed over the years: What is my unique value added per unit of (my) effort?

Supervision is about developing a professional, collaborative relationship in which both parties share responsibility and feel accountable to one another as they both strive to meet the goals of their organization. Supervision is a skill and a craft – one’s title, salary, and professional portfolio do not automatically or universally make someone an effective supervisor.