What’s love got to do with it? When it comes to power – whether it’s held by a person, a group, or a country – the answer is: a lot. In fact, the secret to influence may come down to the power of love. As alum of the Wexner Heritage Program, we have all learned that there are many different ways to exercise leadership and different strategies work for different

The picture shows Kadri Cakrani along with the others in Berat, Albania during the war.  The July 2018, Wexner Foundation newsletter included a piece I authored titled “How Keeping Promises Saved Jews in Albania.” It was about how Albanians, the majority of whom are Muslim, gave refuge to Jews during the 1930’s and ‘40s. Since writing that piece, my involvement with the Albanian diaspora and the people and governments of

I’m seated at the front of the room as co-chair of a committee called Dialogue Initiative. Everyone walks into the room with a mix of enthusiasm and reservation.   We’ve sold the meeting as a place to have difficult conversations, with one big caveat: the goal is not to convince somebody else to change their mind. While our deepest desire may be to learn the tools for persuasive arguments, the goal we have all agreed upon is to learn to listen. The banter will

This year — in this unusual and uncertain year — unable to gather in community I chose instead to pray outside. The words and songs of the service streamed out of my phone, which sat neatly tucked into my tool belt I had been weeding as I prayed along, enjoying the morning sunshine and the cool fall air. I think it was out somewhere between the rows of fading sunflowers

Exploring the concept of ‘separate but equal’ put me in wonder of whether true gender equality could even exist. If men and women identify, are by nature or are commanded differently than one another – in aspirations, in household roles, in behaviors, in characteristics, in job selections, in interests, in required religious and ritual observance – can and do we truly attribute to each the same value? I determined that theoretically we could, but in  how things played out in reality - not even close.

If you asked an expert when these various changes to the workplace would finally take hold in America, you probably would have been told in another 10+ years. COVID-19 has acted like the illustrious InstantPot, taking everything we had and expediting the process. Well, almost everything. Due to the high-pressure speed at which recipes are cooked, when an ingredient is left out of the InstantPot, it’s very noticeable. A lack of salt, acid or rich umami flavor will be noticed instantly. I have a bad taste in my mouth as a result of this COVID-19 workplace stew, because we forgot the women.

"Without the misery of the past, I would never know my gratitude for the present.” After a not unsurprising professional change, Jen processed what she had encountered throughout her career and used it to propel her forward, rather than keeping her behind.

"It’s important to remember that Jewish law commands us to take time to heal our souls and to focus on reducing our anxieties by finding moments of joy and purpose amidst the chaos."

Last winter, during the Q&A portion of a panel I’d participated in at B’nai Jeshurun, a synagogue on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, a 5-year-old Black girl’s question punctuated the evening’s conversation with a question that pierced my heart like an arrow.

As I watched the tragic death of George Floyd and the ensuing protests across our country and the world, I recalled Rabbi Paley’s introduction to Tikun Olam during my cohort’s first Wexner retreat. If ever there was a need for repair, it is now. Based on my experience, it is a tough road. Acknowledging that the dice are loaded in my favor was counterintuitive. It was not my daily experience.

Applications for Class 5 of the Wexner Field Fellowship are now open. Apply today.