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Wexner Graduate Fellowship/Davidson Scholars Program


As I have tried to reify this notion of proximity in my own work and life, I have found it helpful to think about it on multiple levels, each with its own specific action and accompanying spiritual work. The following framework is a work in progress; I welcome your reactions and reflections.

More than pre-Pandemic, I appreciate the value of getting closer to something in order to better understand it.

Professionals like me who work on campus strive to create a welcoming atmosphere for Jewish students so they can take pride in their identities...Our bests moments are the moments of pride in being Jewish, celebration, and self-affirmation. Antisemitism can’t take that away from us. And it won’t.

The truth is, I know that I probably would not have applied had the pandemic not happened, and so I am grateful for this silver lining in the cloudy COVID-19 days. This forced change that we all endured inspired to me to listen to my heart and consider what change and impact I wanted to make in the Jewish world.

Looking back on the past 34 years since the fellowship launched, we feel tremendous pride – in our Alumni, in our current Fellows, and in the program itself. And we know it’s time for a change.

When I embarked on my transition, I was looking forward to reaching my next destination. Six years later, I have realized that there is a deep value in holding on to the experience of transition itself. With the discomfort of transition comes a unique brand of wisdom and perspective.

If we allow ourselves to be counterintuitive and limit ourselves, it seems we might stimulate our creative sparks of imagination for our communal projects, in addition to our personal imagination.

During our ongoing shared global pandemic and time of political and social crisis, we better appreciate the need for both science and religion, for the rule of law, guidance of public policy, and the supreme sensitivity to human suffering and aspirations of all kinds.

Supervision is about developing a professional, collaborative relationship in which both parties share responsibility and feel accountable to one another as they both strive to meet the goals of their organization. Supervision is a skill and a craft – one’s title, salary, and professional portfolio do not automatically or universally make someone an effective supervisor.

Applications are open for Class 34 of the Wexner Israel Fellowship.