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Israel


The power of career changes in the new occupational world, which emphasizes abilities and projects rather than skills and trades, lies in the fact that nothing is ever lost.

When I embarked on my transition, I was looking forward to reaching my next destination. Six years later, I have realized that there is a deep value in holding on to the experience of transition itself. With the discomfort of transition comes a unique brand of wisdom and perspective.

Even if some of the stats above aren't consistent with our personal opinions, we knew that we could hold multiple truths, as could those in our community, so we entered into a chevruta (learning partnership), to name explicitly which profound truths we were each  holding and which we agreed on. While we discovered that we were not that far apart from each other, it was important to continue to engage on this topic in an era of disturbing polarization, one that is characterized by a lack of nuanced dialogue, where saying the “wrong” thing can you get “cancelled,” instead of giving you an opportunity to learn.

Reversing climate change is a multi-dimensional, multi-generational task. Energy transition will require new policies, technologies, communal thinking, and creative solutions. Our community will need to lead through its actions, advocacy, and intentional leadership. This generational endeavor will need to confront economic interests, conspiracy theorists, anti-globalists, and haters of different stripes.

As a lifelong entrepreneur, the last time I had a boss was when I was an associate at a law firm in the 1980s. But I was yearning to do something that would have a profound impact on the world, and which would remind everyone of Israel as a center of innovation.

Jews around the world expect Israel to be a country where Jewish education and the price of living a Jewish life is included in the package. From a distance, it appears to be so.

A gradual return is extremely important as it is what lets us process the events. If we plunge back into our normal routine, the outcome is amnesia of sorts. We delete the events from our minds without having processed them properly and it might meet us unprepared next time.

To walk in someone’s shoes is to feel empathy. I want to take this maxim and go farther – all the way to Ethiopia in the winter of 2023.

The images and news emerging from our beloved Israel - your homes and communities - break my heart. I pray that you and your loved ones remain safe.

We are devastated by the news out of Israel these last hours. Joy turned in an instant to tragedy…from dancing to death in a few horrific moments at Mount Meron.